Maintained by: NLnet Labs

rfc6761 compliance

Robert Edmonds
Tue Sep 22 18:27:28 CEST 2015


W.C.A. Wijngaards via Unbound-users wrote:
> It is not a particularly heavy root server load to mitigate, less code
> is better and easier, the unblock-lan-zones statement is a frequently
> asked question from our users.  That said, we could add new code for
> this (and .onion?).

Hi, Wouter:

I would guess that the .test and .invalid zones are much less used in
private networks than the .in-addr.arpa ones, so much less likely to be
a FAQ.  And most of the code to setup default empty zones has been
written already.

Here are the caching DNS considerations for the zones that Unbound
currently doesn't handle:

[ "test." ]
       Caching DNS servers SHOULD recognize test names as special and
       SHOULD NOT, by default, attempt to look up NS records for them,
       or otherwise query authoritative DNS servers in an attempt to
       resolve test names.  Instead, caching DNS servers SHOULD, by
       default, generate immediate negative responses for all such
       queries.  This is to avoid unnecessary load on the root name
       servers and other name servers.  Caching DNS servers SHOULD offer
       a configuration option (disabled by default) to enable upstream
       resolving of test names, for use in networks where test names are
       known to be handled by an authoritative DNS server in said
       private network.

[ "invalid." ]
       Caching DNS servers SHOULD recognize "invalid" names as special
       and SHOULD NOT attempt to look up NS records for them, or
       otherwise query authoritative DNS servers in an attempt to
       resolve "invalid" names.  Instead, caching DNS servers SHOULD
       generate immediate NXDOMAIN responses for all such queries.  This
       is to avoid unnecessary load on the root name servers and other
       name servers.

[ "onion." ]
       Caching DNS Servers: Caching servers, where not explicitly
       adapted to interoperate with Tor, SHOULD NOT attempt to look up
       records for .onion names.  They MUST generate NXDOMAIN for all
       such queries.

I notice the .onion Special-Use registration has a MUST while the other
two only have SHOULDs.

Probably there will be a few more additions to the Special-Use Domain
Names registry, and even if they only generate a trivial amount of root
server load now, that means it's easy to prevent them from becoming a
problem later :-)

-- 
Robert Edmonds
edmonds at debian.org